Sensei Roemke Ninja Training

Sensei Roemke is the founder of Santa Cruz Bujinkan Dojo and was awarded 15th Dan in Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu by Hatsumi Soke, the highest rank possible. He teaches the comprehensive ninjutsu lessons seen in the “Basics of Ninja Training”® black belt course and the Ninja Training Video Blog.© Sensei Roemke has studied Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu for three decades and is licensed to teach by Soke Hatsumi. He created the Santa Cruz Bujinkan Dojo almost two decades ago and specializes in all weapons including Enshin Itto Ryu Battojutsu (“the art of sword drawing and cutting.”) A former New York state Tae Kwon Do Champion, Sensei Roemke is also trained in Kenpo Kung Fu, DeCuerdas Eskrima, Seibukan Jujutsu and military fighting tactics of the Army 10th Mountain Infantry.  One of the contributing partners for this website, Sensei has been sharing his wisdom online since 2009.

Santa Cruz Bujinkan Dojo Patch

Ancient swords and computer networks help Sensei Roemke unveil a mission to educate people about Ninjutsu, Bujinkan, the ancient art of the Ninja

California Bujinkan Shihan Mark Roemke has been on a mission to educate people about how Ninja training can be a path toward personal enlightenment, self improvement and self defense safety.  The latest internet technology and timeless Japanese swords are the tools that help him expose a local and global audience to the mysterious form of martial art known as ‘Ninjutsu’ or ‘Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu.’

Sensei Roemke and a growing alliance of ninja experts and media developers present martial arts training on “Ninja Learning Network,” an ambitious program of instructional videos, training, education and social networking centered around the web site www.Ninja-Learning-Network.com and social media. That site will serve as a hub for instructional material, podcasts and blogs, Ninja training videos from around the world and regular videocasts of training/demonstrations out of their dojo next to Santa Cruz, California and other remote locations. Sensei Roemke explains that,

“Most people still aren’t aware that the artform of ‘ninjutsu,’ or ‘ninja’ is accessible to everyone now since Hatsumi Soke opened it to the world fairly recently.  We started the Santa Cruz Bujinkan Dojo about 10 years ago to get people excited about this form of martial art, but it’s only now that technology will let us celebrate it with the whole world. We already have fans from Brazil, Denmark, Belgium, Germany, Argentina, Netherlands and even Japan who appreciate our educational resource and are really getting into Bujinkan. We want everyone to know how to protect themselves, gain enlightenment and serve universal justice thru daily practice of ninjutsu. This is the motivation of Soke Hatsumi in Japan, and we are following his lead.”

Ninja Learning Network is launching with free educational Ninjutsu (Bujinkan) videos and is already gathering a budding online community of young people who are new to martial arts, but they are also garnering old-timers from other martial arts such as Tae Kwon Do, Aikido, MMA, and Karate who are just now able to watch ninja training online.  Long-time Bujinkan practitioners invited by Sensei Roemke are set to contribute their wisdom to the NLN with posted articles, video lessons and live workshops.  The educational videos produced by NLN with Sensei Roemke will focus on the formal aspects of the basics, to help students acquire a solid base of knowledge to safely and properly attain an ultimate level of body control that is the essence of the artform.  “There are a few Bujinkan instructors who are already using Youtube to demonstrate various quick techniques for practical self defense. They’re great. But we want to present high quality information that helps potential students achieve a sound base from which to grow into highly accomplished Ninjas. They can theoretically learn a whole curriculum from our Basics of Ninja Training videos on the Ninja Learning Network – although training should always include direct mentorship from a teacher.  The better you are at achieving honed skills grounded in the basics, the more effective your “street fighting self defense” performance will be anyway. That’s why our subject matter focuses on the forms and techniques we learn directly from the Bujinkan’s grand master Soke Hatsumi when we train with him in Japan,” says Sensei Roemke.

Body control and unarmed fighting/evasion techniques are central to Ninjutsu study, but weapons training is also a key component of study.  Sensei Roemke and invited guest masters are planning a series of free self defense  and weapons demonstrations. And guests are always invited to view regular lessons at the Bujinkan dojo near Santa Cruz, California to watch real Ninja training.   Sensei Roemke says,  “Anybody can do this!  Bujinkan technique is the opposite of pounding your fist repeatedly into someone’s face hoping your wrist bones are stronger than their cheekbones.  After you watch just one of our self defense videos you will see that “deflecting the power of the opponent with subtle moves” can be much more effective than trying to overpower them with brute force.  It’s so cool! And it’s a great workout, too.”

What drives most of the enthusiasm for Sensei Roemke and other partners at the Santa Cruz Bujinkan Dojo is the personal improvement and enlightenment aspect of devoted study. Bujinkan Grand Master Masaaki Hatsumi writes about this in his books a great deal.  Like other martial arts, studying to become a ninja evokes a sense of accomplishment and enlightenment about personal ability and interaction with others, it can be a vehicle for greater “universal justice.”  One of the interesting aspects of the Ninja training project for Sensei Roemke is community involvement as he explains that, “We are really excited to be talking to a local youth group right now about bringing in young people who really need something ultra cool to help them learn about their personal potential.  Under the sort of mentorship that is inherent in ninja study, we can really help them.  It’s actually pretty easy, too, in a way. It has fewer rules and structures compared to other martial arts, it encourages people to explore their own techniques based on simple concepts. There is a sort of spiritual aspect to it while also feeling like a fun sport. Almost everyone who checks it out gets stoked! That’s what we are all about.”